Wednesday, February 29, 2012

Future Technology in Present Day

Future Technology in Present Day - YouTube

Thursday, February 23, 2012

'Cash Mobs' profit locally owned stores | PRI.ORG

Steve Shutts, left, and Rob Schwind tally the day’s receipts, Steve’s niece Megan Johnson and brother Jack Shutts celebrate the final sale at the Chagrin Hardware in Chagrin Falls, Ohio. Hundreds of supporters of the family-owned business flocked

You’ve heard of flash mobs, where people appear to randomly gather and break into elaborate song and dance routines.

But now, a new phenomenon, called “Cash Mobs,” is spreading.

Instead of breaking into song, members of cash mobs break open their wallets to spend money at locally owned businesses.

More @ PRI.ORG

Wednesday, February 22, 2012

Riusuke Fukahori Paints Three-Dimensional Goldfish Embedded in Layers of Resin | Colossal

Riusuke Fukahori Paints Three Dimensional Goldfish Embedded in Layers of Resin sculpture painting fish art

Japanese artist Riusuke Fukahori paints three-dimensional goldfish using a complex process of poured resin. The fish are painted meticulously, layer by layer, the sandwiched slices revealing slightly more about each creature, similar to the function of a 3D printer. I really enjoy the rich depth of the pieces and the optical illusion aspect, it’s such an odd process that results in something that’s both a painting and sculptural. Wonderful.

More @ Colossal

Tuesday, February 21, 2012

Synesthesia: Can You Taste the Difference Between Sounds? | PRI's The World

Oxford University psychologist Charles Spence studies human senses and how they interact. In recent studies, he had people smell wines and sample chocolate, and then match the different aromas and flavors to different musical sounds.

He found that people tend to associate sweet tastes with high-pitched notes and the sounds of a piano. People match bitter flavors with low notes and brass instruments.

Spence wondered if he could put this finding to use. Could he use music to influence what people smell or taste?

To find out, he conducted another study. He had volunteers eat several pieces of toffee while listening to music. One soundscape was composed of “sweet” sounds, the other of “bitter” sounds.

Spence then asked the volunteers to rate the sweetness or bitterness of each piece of toffee. All of the toffee was the same, but the volunteers perceived the pieces differently.

“We were significantly able to change the rating of the bitterness and sweetness of the food depending on the sound they were listening to,” says Spence.

More @ PRI's The World

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